iBookstore growth continues: Perseus inks e-book deal with Apple for iPad

“Apple’s iBookstore on the forthcoming iPad is set to get larger. The company has just signed a deal with the largest distributor of independent publishers to sell electronic versions of it books on the new device,” Motoko Rich and Brad Stone report for The New York Times.

“Perseus Books Group, a large independent publisher that also distributes works from 330 other smaller presses including Grove Atlantic, Harvard Business School Press, Zagat and City Lights Books, signed a deal last week with Apple, following five of the six biggest publishers that have already signed agreements with Apple,” Rich and Stone report. “Perseus’s deal comes as Amazon.com, the largest online seller of printed books and the biggest e-book seller in the United States, has put pressure on publishers who have not yet signed deals with Apple to refrain from doing so. Amazon, which makes the Kindle e-reader, holds about 90 percent of the e-book market.”

MacDailyNews Take: Not for long.

Rich and Stone continue, “With Apple’s iPad coming on the scene, Amazon is fighting to keep as much of its market lead as possible.

“Publishers have provisionally welcomed Apple’s entry into the market because Apple’s deals allow publishers to set consumer prices, within limits. Publishers have had no control over consumer prices at Amazon, which has generally sold new releases and best sellers for $9.99, a price that publishers feared would erode profits in the long term,” Rich and Stone report. “Like the five other publishers who have already signed with Apple, Perseus will set consumer prices and Apple will serve as an agent, taking a 30 percent commission on each sale. E-book versions of most newly released adult general fiction and nonfiction will cost $12.99 to $14.99. All publishers whose books are distributed by Perseus will be allowed to opt in to the deal.”

Full article here.

24 Comments

  1. Your such a focktard. Is that all you you have?! None of “us” said the books should be free. What “we” did say is that an electronic version of an author’s book should be priced according to format. You don’t pay the same price for a softcover as you do a hardcover. Accordingly, there should be consideration in pricing when the associated cost of printing, storing and shipping is removed. And if the price is still not attractive to you at 9.99 or 14.99, then publish independently and set your own price.

  2. Your such a focktard. Is that all you you have?! None of “us” said the books should be free. What “we” did say is that an electronic version of an author’s book should be priced according to format. You don’t pay the same price for a softcover as you do a hardcover. Accordingly, there should be consideration in pricing when the associated cost of printing, storing and shipping is removed. And if the price is still not attractive to you at 9.99 or 14.99, then publish independently and set your own price.

  3. Your such a focktard. Is that all you you have?! None of “us” said the books should be free. What “we” did say is that an electronic version of an author’s book should be priced according to format. You don’t pay the same price for a softcover as you do a hardcover. Accordingly, there should be consideration in pricing when the associated cost of printing, storing and shipping is removed. And if the price is still not attractive to you at 9.99 or 14.99, then publish independently and set your own price.

  4. Your such a focktard. Is that all you you have?! None of “us” said the books should be free. What “we” did say is that an electronic version of an author’s book should be priced according to format. You don’t pay the same price for a softcover as you do a hardcover. Accordingly, there should be consideration in pricing when the associated cost of printing, storing and shipping is removed. And if the price is still not attractive to you at 9.99 or 14.99, then publish independently and set your own price.

  5. Your such a focktard. Is that all you you have?! None of “us” said the books should be free. What “we” did say is that an electronic version of an author’s book should be priced according to format. You don’t pay the same price for a softcover as you do a hardcover. Accordingly, there should be consideration in pricing when the associated cost of printing, storing and shipping is removed. And if the price is still not attractive to you at 9.99 or 14.99, then publish independently and set your own price.

  6. Your such a focktard. Is that all you you have?! None of “us” said the books should be free. What “we” did say is that an electronic version of an author’s book should be priced according to format. You don’t pay the same price for a softcover as you do a hardcover. Accordingly, there should be consideration in pricing when the associated cost of printing, storing and shipping is removed. And if the price is still not attractive to you at 9.99 or 14.99, then publish independently and set your own price.

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