Apple Genius Bar tech claims NYC iPhone calls drop at rate of 30 percent

“Nearly a third of all iPhone calls made in the New York City area are dropped, according to a Genius Bar technician at Apple’s SoHo retail store,” MacNN reports.

“A person who recently brought his iPhone 3G to the outlet says he complained of being repeatedly disconnected, thinking the issue was related to faulty hardware,” MacNN reports. “On testing, the Genius is noted to have discovered that over 22 percent of the phone’s calls had been dropped.”

MacNN reports, “That result is actually better than normal, the technician claims, citing a regional average of 30 percent.”

Full article here.

32 Comments

  1. I note about a 30% average of dropped calls myself…but there is also a percentage of just weak or garbled calls some of which are just digital noise…probably in the 3% range of all calls. Some of this is just in the nature of cellular communications. But a lot of it is due to the locations of the cell towers AT&T;has (Verizon really is better in terms of total coverage)…and the need to continue to build the network. In an urban environment It’s tougher to get truly blanket coverage since the cell tower real estate is more limited and compromised.

  2. I actually have to say that the ATT coverage in my area (north Phoenix) has steadily improved from the first time I bought my iPhone (initial launch) to now. But on a recent trip to NYC/Newark area I noticed a considerable drop in connection quality and increase in dropped calls.

  3. Wow, even 22% is terrible. 30% is crazy horrible.

    In my neck of the woods, I probably drop 5-10% of my calls at the most. The only exception is when I talk to my old man in his house behind a hill in a small city… I probably lose him 20-30% of the time.

  4. The problem isn’t the iPhone or even ATT, it is the concrete canyons of Manhattan and surrounding environs.

    You’d have to put a tower on top of every other skyscraper to overcome the canyon effect, or change the freqs used to 700Mhz. 900Mhz just can’t do it (not enough penetration power).

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.