Former Pink Floyd manager slams Apple’s iTunes Store for ‘debundling the album’

“One time manager of Pink Floyd, Sincere Management’s Pete Jenner slammed iTunes for its effect on album sales at a UK music industry event this week,” Jonny Evans reports for Distorted-Loop.

“Speaking at a MusicTank conference, he said Apple’s music store has ‘had the disastrous effect on the record industry of debundling the album.’ He complained cherry-picking tracks from albums means consumers now ‘buy the two album tracks that are worth buying,’ Music Week informs,” Evans reports.

Full article here.

Consumers now have the ability to buy only the music that’s “worth buying.”

Imagine that.

As we’ve previously explained multiple times, Pete Jenner confirms that the album is an artificial construct or “bundle” designed to force consumers to pay more for the bits they want. Welcome to the new paradigm, Pete; however many years late you may be. The customer — long ripped-off by the music cartels — is firmly in power now. Choice now reigns supreme.

Ironically, Pink Floyd is one of the examples of bands whose music is often worth buying in the album form and playing in the order laid out by the artist. But, that is neither here nor there. The point is that the choice should be in the hands of the consumers and now, thanks to Apple, it is.

So, buy albums when you deem them worthy, but be thankful that you have the choice to debundle as you like; it’ll only make music better in the long run as “filler” will cease to be created.

81 Comments

  1. Hey, I’m a big fan of Pink Floyd, but did their former manager even bother to read what he’s quoted as saying, “He complained cherry-picking tracks from albums means consumers now ‘buy the two album tracks that are worth buying,'”

    What more proof do you need that the album was an artificial construct as MDN says?

    I think you have to give a little credit to consumers to find music they like and then make purchase decisions from there. I think the way it can work, and does work, is someone hears a song, likes the song, buys the song and then will search for more songs from that same band or group to buy. If an “album” is strong enough, people will buy it. If it isn’t, they won’t. But maybe the artist will have sold a million singles instead of very few albums because of the ability to buy a single song.

  2. Well, he even said so himself: that most people ‘buy the two album tracks that are worth buying.’

    Why should I be made to purchase songs that are not worth buying?? Duh….

  3. “He complained cherry-picking tracks from albums means consumers now ‘buy the two album tracks that are worth buying.'”

    I’m sorry, did he actually say “the two album tracks that are worth buying”? And he’s complaining about that? So he thinks consumers should be forced to buy tracks that aren’t worth buying?

    Mouth, meet foot.

  4. Here’s where MDN is dead ass wrong when it comes to albums like those made by Pink Floyd, which should be sold as a single piece of art. You don’t buy just the mouth of the Mona Lisa.

  5. M,

    Ignoring the entire take in order to wrongly criticize only highlights your stupidity:

    “So, buy albums when you deem them worthy, but be thankful that you have the choice to debundle as you like; it’ll only make music better in the long run as “filler” will cease to be created.” – MacDailyNews

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