PC World doofus blames Apple for lack of DRM-free music in iTunes Store

“iTunes gave us the 99-cent song download, thus paving the way for honest people to buy music at a fair price. So why does the iTunes Store still employ digital rights management (DRM) for the majority of songs in its library? Blaming the record labels no longer holds water: AmazonMP3 and Rhapsody are among a growing number of services selling DRM-free MP3s from all the major labels, not just EMI. At least iTunes no longer charges extra for the latter’s “iTunes Plus” selections, but why hasn’t Apple given DRM the heave-ho once and for all? At least customers have alternatives now,” Rick Broida reports for PC World.

The full article, “11 Things We Hate About iTunes,” in which Broida claims that Apple could fix this DRM issue and all of the others he lists “in about 5 minutes,” here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “shiftOpt k” for the heads up.]

4 Reasons Why Rick Broida is a Doofus:
1. It was Apple CEO Steve Jobs who called for the elimination of music DRM back in February 2007.
2. It was Apple that signed the first major music label, EMI, to sell DRM-free songs two months later in April 2007.
3. It is precisely the music labels (greedy collusive slime buckets) that are withholding DRM-free from Apple in a effort to weaken iTunes Store’s power.
4. He writes for PC World which actually publishes such obtuse, ignorant, and completely backwards drivel.

52 Comments

  1. If Rick Broida truly had no idea that Apple has been championing DRM-free tracks and that major labels give them only to iTunes competitors (in an attempt to weaken iTunes), then he was not qualified to write about the iTunes store in the first place. Unbelievable.

  2. Whoa Whoa Whoa…

    Yes, it’s the record companies who have insisted in DRM tracks for iTunes.

    And Yes, it’s Apple who has resisted some type of variable pricing that the record companies have been asking for.

    So yes, it’s the companies fault we do have DRM, and it’s also Apple’s fault that we continue to have DRM. It’s fine to point fingers at the record labels, but rest assured, there are others pointing fingers back at Apple, and both are right.

    Personally, I don’t find DRM a huge problem, but I can easily understand why others do.

  3. Jjltnol:

    I think you don’t have all the facts. The finger should be pointed squarely (and exclusively) at labels for continued DRM on iTunes.

    Jobs has, as we know, written the famous open letter over a year and a half ago, asking for DRM-free music. More than a year ago, EMI came on board as (still heretofore) the only label to sell DRM-free “iTunes Plus” tracks.

    Labels profess the finger is to be pointed at Apple for not allowing flexible pricing; the argument goes, if only Jobs allowed flexible pricing, labels would allow DRM-free stuff. It does not hold water, however, since on Amazon, where these labels have offered DRM-free music at the same prices as on iTunes.

    In other words, labels are lying. It is completely up to them. If they allowed Apple to offer exactly the same stuff at exactly the same prices as they allow Amazon, DRM would cease to exist, as far as online music is concerned (Video, on the other hand, is an entirely different, sad story…).

  4. Let’s think for a moment: Don’t the music labels responsible for keeping iTunes loaded with DRMful tracks want the people to think Apple is to blame so they boicott iTunes say, for Amazon’s MP3 Store?

  5. Saldin,

    I believe that is exactly what MDN refers to when they use the word ‘collusion’. As in, collude with each other in order to undermine someone who is perceived as a thread to their business, or a competitor.

  6. What is it with PeeCee writers taking cheap shots at Apple today? Could it be sour grapes as a result of Vista’s turdliness, or just general mental deficiency?

  7. “Saldin
    Let’s think for a moment: Don’t the music labels responsible for keeping iTunes loaded with DRMful tracks want the people to think Apple is to blame so they boicott iTunes say, for Amazon’s MP3 Store?”

    but that requires thinking….

    lets think further. what does Apple get from DRM. a strike against the iTMS. what would Apple gain from dropping DRM. massively increased sales.

    ….yeah, it must be Apple keeping the DRM!

  8. Could it be sour grapes as a result of Vista’s turdliness, or just general mental deficiency?

    It’s a lot of both.

    Just curious, but what is the bit-rate for Amazon’s mp3s or any other music service?

  9. What his article states clearly is the market and general population’s PERCEPTION of how things are. Those folks that do not follow every piece of news out there, but only read the headlines… Easy to confuse then and distort things, and easy to publish an article and get paid for it without looking at any facts.

  10. If the music companies refuse to let Apple have the same DRM free music that they willingly sell to others, then Apple needs to do something about it. I suggest they do what they did to NBC and stop selling any more until the dinosaurs get the hint.

    I don’t even understand how the music co’s get away with such discriminatory behavior in the first place.

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