“When Greenpeace protesters convened outside last year’s Macworld Expo, Apple CEO Steve Jobs dismissed the environmentalists by suggesting they ‘get out of the computer business [and] go save some whales,'” Bryan Gardiner reports for Wired.

“At this year’s Macworld, it was a different story. There were no protesters pounding on the Moscone West doors. Indeed, after introducing the svelte Macbook Air on Tuesday, Jobs took a moment to do something he’s never done while introducing a new product at Macworld: Update the audience on its environmental specs. What’s more, he said he would continue to do the same with every major product introduction in the future,” Gardiner reports.

“‘We continue to make progress on all of these environmental fronts, and we’ll keep you posted,’ Jobs said. ‘They all add up to something in the end, and we’re very conscious of this,'” Gardiner reports.

“Among other highlights Tuesday, Jobs cited the fact that the new Macbook Air is clad in a fully recyclable aluminum case and stated that aluminum is one of the most recyclable materials on the market,” Gardiner reports. “Jobs also told audience members that the Macbook Air will include the company’s first mercury- and arsenic-free display and that all of the Apple-designed circuit boards — which are the vast majority of the circuit boards in the unit — are free of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic, two substances commonly found in consumer electronics that critics say pose hazards to the environment and to human health.”

“Yet the sum total of these self-described eco-milestones didn’t impress Greenpeace,” Gardiner reports. “‘Apple is getting greener, but not green enough,’ said Rick Hind, the legislative director of Greenpeace’s toxics campaign. ‘The Macbook Air has less toxic PVC plastic and less toxic BFRs, but it could have zero and that would make Apple an eco-leader,’ he added. While applauding Jobs’ new focus on environmental specs, Greenpeace noted that Jobs did not outline Apple’s plans to honor its 2007 pledge to eliminate these toxics materials in all Apple products by the end of 2008. That pledge was made in an open letter Jobs published last May.”

MacDailyNews Take: Sorry, RIckie, if Jobs decided not to waste his entire keynote presentation talking about your pet issues. Read the letter again; it hasn’t changed. Apple will never be “green enough” for these people because then their free publicity would dry up. Nobody would care if Grenepeace were hounding some dime-a-dozen PC box assembler like Dell. And if nobody cares, nobody joins and, most importantly, nobody donates.

Gardiner reports, “Despite a year of critiquing Apple’s environmental track record, Greenpeace maintains it’s not a case of eco-bullying, as Apple and others have alleged. ‘Apple sometimes gets really defensive,’ Hind admits. ‘They say: Why are you picking on us — especially when we have such a small market share compared to the rest of the industry?’ The reason, according to Hind, is simple. Apple is seen as a tech leader, especially when it comes to innovation. Even though companies like Dell and HP are much larger and ship many more computers, Greenpeace singles out Apple in order to draw attention to the whole tech industry’s eco policies, Hind says.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Too Hot!” for the heads up.]

And there you have it, Greenpeace gives worse polluters like HP and Dell basically a free pass, but Greenpeace continues to use Apple whenever and wherever possible to generate their own free publicity. Then these PR leeches pile back into their hybrids, because they care oh-so-much about the environment, yet they’re too stupid to realize or too lazy to research that they’re polluting Mother Earth even more than most people by wasting almost 50 percent more energy than by driving a Hummer.

But, of course, if they really cared about the environment enough to do their research and dumped their hybrids for more environmentally-responsible Hummers — or God forbid an even more efficient gasoline-powered vehicle — well, then they wouldn’t qualify for their environmental tax credits, now would they? And people wouldn’t read their “Save the Earth” bumper stickers with the same amount of conviction. And, anyway, it’s not about what’s real, it’s how you feel. Besides, NASA needs a place on Earth where they can test moon rovers.

Greenpeace are a bunch of frauds; just a group that long ago lost their way and who are now nothing more than an insincere PR machine.

As we’ve shown above, any issue can be twisted to make whatever point you want to make, just ask a decent lawyer. We know, oxymoron. The bottom line is that Apple is making progress on the environment and is being unfairly singled out for their PR value by Greenpeace. If everyone did a little bit to help improve the environment, turn off some lights, make a list before you go out on errands to cut down on driving, and a million other little things, the environment would be a whole lot better than it is now and certainly improve more than Greenpeace is facilitating by constantly attacking Apple just to get their name in the paper.

More about Apple’s environmental efforts here.