Net Applications: Apple’s Mac OS share exceeded 8% in last days of December 2007

“Apple’s market share gains in December for the Mac and iPhone are impressive. However, for the last days of December, the numbers are nothing short of spectacular,” Net Applications reports in an article posted on their Market Share Website.

First, the month-to-month numbers:
(Product: November Share, December Share)
Mac: 6.80%, 7.31%
iPhone: .09%, .12%

Net Applications reports, “Apple’s market share rose 7.5% for the Mac and 33% for the iPhone in a single month. However, the really good news for Apple came at the end of the month. For the last two days of December, Apple had the following numbers:

Product: December 30-31 Share:
Mac: 8.01%
iPhone: .17%

Net Applications reports, “This represents a phenomenal increase of 18% from November for the Mac and 89% for the iPhone. In addition, the iPhone has been taking off in France and the other countries it has been launched in, including an amazing .27% share of web browsing in the United States.”

Country: iPhone Browsing Share December 30-31:
United States: 0.27%
United Kingdom: 0.11%
France: 0.10%

Net Applications reports, “Another interesting aspect of this data is that these numbers do not include visitors using Windows on Mac hardware via Boot Camp or other program. Therefore, these numbers actually understate the market share for the Mac. We have no way of telling by how much, however.”

Full article here.

13 Comments

  1. It would be interesting to hear how many Macs & iPhones were sold when SJ gives his keynote. We would the be able to estimate the market share. As for installed base, I’m not sure anybody but Apple could estimate that figure.

    Phenomenal!

  2. Macs are more prevalent at home than at the office, therefore during the holidays it is normal to see an increase in Mac usage. Lets not get overexcited until we get the January numbers.

    That said, Microsoft is a hard nut to crack. Despite a continuous string of successes, Apple is still at under 10%. Let’s hope this is the year we see Apple break that psychological mark.

  3. “Macs are more prevalent at home than at the office . . .”

    That is changing in a way that will baffle and annoy IT admins. Like the iPod, the iPhone is another halo effect device that will sell more Macs but with more legitimate uses at work than an iPod.

  4. “Net Applications reports, “Another interesting aspect of this data is that these numbers do not include visitors using Windows on Mac hardware via Boot Camp or other program. Therefore, these numbers actually understate the market share for the Mac. We have no way of telling by how much, however.”

    It would be nice if that mattered, but because most, if not all, people using windoze on their Macs are only using it to run games, chances are this is not significant.

  5. Wade … it’s true. Most people using Windows on a Mac are not “reverse switchers”, they have a need for Windows and have chosen a Mac. While some will use a Windows browser on their Macs, that will be “not the usual thing”. For example, while I was at Putnam I helped test the web software we were installing – I had a Mac at home and the testers all had PCs. My info was of interest, but not a high priority (I suspect). And I was maybe the one person involved who could provide it. Those testers may be getting Macs … “soon”.
    Dave

  6. Dutch: “Despite a continuous string of successes, Apple is still at under 10%.”

    Well, considering how well Apple has done with such modest gains, imagine what’ll happen by the time it reaches 25%….

  7. Ampar is right. In my own workplace, several previously hard-core windows folks have switched (without, I might add, prompting by me since I’m still officially not supposed to evangelize Macs).

    We’re on the cusp of a huge wave of Mac adoptions.

  8. Jooop,

    That’s because within many corporations, IT departments have built a ‘secret culture’ whose entire ‘existence-as-they-know-it’ relies on staying a MS shop. To them, the world would end if this dominance ended.
    The more control MS has of an organisation’s IT department, the more money the IT department is given, the more ‘prestige’, influence and followers it gains, the more staff it will recruit, the more money it can demand, and the thing just keeps cycling around and around. Suddenly, your IT department is bigger than the ones which actually create the wealth for the organisation.

    So your typical IT guy with a Mac bent has to keep a low profile, as challenging the ‘religious orthodoxy’ of this secret MS sect within an organisation would see you stuffed into an old server case and thrown in the basement. And whilst your being dragged down 30 flights of stairs, you will hear every Mac myth and piece of MS propaganda ever invented. Many of these “IT Pros” know nothing whatsoever about Macintosh beyond circa 1990 and actively choose not to know. That’s a dangerous culture to allow to exist in a corporation.
    I myself was threatened with disciplinary action if I kept challenging this MS orthodoxy in my organisation.
    Of course, this threat has merely shifted my strategy. I now work on switching staff to use Macs at home. I’m hearing more and more “God I hate Windows, it would be so much easier if I could have a Mac at work.” Eventually the groundswell of calls for Macs at work will become too load to be ignored.

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