Apple allows virtualization of Mac OS X Leopard Server

“In a notable about-face, Apple has changed its stance with regard to allowing Mac OS X Server to be run inside a virtual machine (VM), much as Parallels Desktop and VMware Fusion make it possible to run Windows and other PC-based operating systems on a Mac. Until the release of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard Server, Apple’s software license agreement explicitly forbade running multiple copies of Mac OS X Server on a single Mac, preventing Parallels and VMware from including Mac OS X Server among the operating systems that could be virtualized legally,” Adam C. Engst reports for TidBITS.

Engst reports that Apple’s Tiger Server software license agreement reads:

This License allows you to install and use one copy of the Mac OS X Server software (the “Mac OS X Server Software”) on a single Apple-labeled computer at a time.

Engst reports, “However, a sharp-eyed systems engineer noticed that Leopard Server’s software license agreement is significantly different. Dave Schroeder, Senior Systems Engineer at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, posted to the MacEnterprise.org mailing list about his finding, calling out this change:”

This License allows you to install and use one copy of the Mac OS X Server software (the “Mac OS X Server Software”) on a single Apple-labeled computer. You may also install and use other copies of Mac OS X Server Software on the same Apple-labeled computer, provided that you acquire an individual and valid license from Apple for each of these other copies of Mac OS X Server Software.

Engst reports, “This change applies only to Leopard Server, not to the desktop version of Leopard. Apple has not changed the software license agreements for either version of Tiger.”

Much more in the full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Readers “macdaddy4nr” and “Too Hot!” for the heads up.]

16 Comments

  1. You’re missing the point. With large, many core servers, all of the cores are often not being utilized. Going virtual, they will be. It’s all about load balancing.

    Servers that are fully utilized won’t be virtualized, that’s not it’s purpose.

  2. Good point, will the power of XServers step up to this? I don’t think Apple will cave any time soon in letting it be virtualized on non-Apple branded hardware, though I don’t think that would necessarily be a bad move for Apple…

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