Apple Board Member Al Gore wins Nobel Peace Prize for global warming work

“The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded today to Al Gore, the former vice president, and to the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change for its work to alert the world to the threat of global warming,” Walter Gibbs reports for The New York Times.

MacDailyNews Note: Al Gore is a member of Apple Inc.’s Board of Directors.

“The award is likely to renew calls from Mr. Gore’s supporters for him to run for president in 2008, joining an already crowded field of Democrats. Mr. Gore, who lost the 2000 presidential election to George W. Bush, has said he is not interested in running but has not flatly rejected the notion,” Gibbs reports.

“Mr. Gore, who was traveling in San Francisco, said in a statement that he was deeply honored to receive the prize and planned to donate his half of the prize to the Alliance for Climate Protection, a nonprofit climate group of which Mr. Gore chairs the board,” Gibbs reports.

“The Nobel award carries political ramifications in the United States, which the Nobel committee tried to minimize after its announcement today,” Gibbs reports. “The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Ole Danbolt Mjoes, addressed reporters after the awards were announced and tried to dismiss repeated questions asking whether the awards were a criticism — direct or indirect — of the Bush administration.”

“In this decade, the Nobel Peace Prize has been given to prominent people and agencies who differ on a range of issues with the Bush administration, including former President Jimmy Carter, who won in 2002, and Mohamed ElBaradei, the director of the United Nations’ nuclear monitoring agency in Vienna, in 2005,” Gibbs reports.

“Global warming has been a powerful issue all this year, attracting more and more public attention. The film documenting Mr. Gore’s campaign to increase awareness of climate change, ‘An Inconvenient Truth,’ won an Academy Award this year,” Gibbs reports.

MacDailyNews Note: Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth,” the highest-grossing documentary of 2006, featured copious use of Apple’s Keynote presentation software, even though many reviewers of the film incorrectly described it as a “PowerPoint” presentation. Apple Keynote use in Gore’s “An Inconvenient Truth” is featured here.

More in Gibbs’ full article here.

MacDailyNews Note: So far — in contrast to with Jimmy Carter’s Nobel Peace Prize win (and perhaps due at least in part to the reaction it precipitated back in 2002) — Apple.com has not been converted into a congratulations page for board member Gore.

227 Comments

  1. What does global warming have to do with the Nobel Peace Prize? Of course, as someone else pointed out, this award has been given to the likes of Yasser Arafat, so it doesn’t have much credibility anyway.

    I guess they give the peace prize to people who produce “documentaries” with “evidence” for global warming.

    In 30 years, we’ll all be talking about global cooling again…

    MW=clearly–Clearly, the Nobel Peace Prize means nothing…

  2. So this idiot was chosen over a woman who actually saved 1500 kids lives in WWII. Exactly how does this fiction documentary contribute to peace. Just ask the english judge who ruled that school kids in England have to be warned of upwards of 11 lies in the movie before it can be shown in schools.

    Wow, the madness goes on.

  3. @middilay,

    Well, so much for the open-mindedness and fairness of progressive liberals like yourself…
    “…rid the earth of tards like this.”

    Nice. Really nice. Instead of wishing you away, I wish, hope and pray that you’ll see that global warming is another false religion.

    NAAH

  4. Let’s see how many of you can read.

    “. . . Internet pioneers Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn wrote a 2000-09-29 article (originally sent via email) which described Gore’s contributions to the Internet since the 1970s, including his work on the Gore Bill:[88]
    “[A]s the two people who designed the basic architecture and the core protocols that make the Internet work, we would like to acknowledge VP Gore’s contributions as a Congressman, Senator and as Vice President. No other elected official, to our knowledge, has made a greater contribution over a longer period of time. Last year the Vice President made a straightforward statement on his role. He said: “During my service in the United States Congress I took the initiative in creating the Internet.” We don’t think, as some people have argued, that Gore intended to claim he “invented” the Internet. Moreover, there is no question in our minds that while serving as Senator, Gore’s initiatives had a significant and beneficial effect on the still-evolving Internet. The fact of the matter is that Gore was talking about and promoting the Internet long before most people were listening. We feel it is timely to offer our perspective. As far back as the 1970s Congressman Gore promoted the idea of high speed telecommunications as an engine for both economic growth and the improvement of our educational system. He was the first elected official to grasp the potential of computer communications to have a broader impact than just improving the conduct of science and scholarship. Though easily forgotten, now, at the time this was an unproven and controversial concept.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Gore

  5. @Registered Democra<strike>p</strike>t

    Let’s see how many of you can read.”

    . . . Internet pioneers Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn wrote a 2000-09-29 article (originally sent via email) which described Gore’s contributions to the Internet since the 1970s, including his work on the Gore Bill:[88]
    “[A]s the two people who designed the basic architecture and the core protocols that make the Internet work, we would like to acknowledge VP Gore’s contributions as a Congressman, Senator and as Vice President. No other elected official, to our knowledge, has made a greater contribution over a longer period of time. Last year the Vice President made a straightforward statement on his role. He said: “During my service in the United States Congress I took the initiative in creating the Internet.” We don’t think, as some people have argued, that Gore intended to claim he “invented” the Internet. Moreover, there is no question in our minds that while serving as Senator, Gore’s initiatives had a significant and beneficial effect on the still-evolving Internet. The fact of the matter is that Gore was talking about and promoting the Internet long before most people were listening. We feel it is timely to offer our perspective. As far back as the 1970s Congressman Gore promoted the idea of high speed telecommunications as an engine for both economic growth and the improvement of our educational system. He was the first elected official to grasp the potential of computer communications to have a broader impact than just improving the conduct of science and scholarship. Though easily forgotten, now, at the time this was an unproven and controversial concept.”

    So he made contributions, pushed initiatives, and talked about and promoted the internet. Doesn’t sound like “creating” (his words) to me.

    MW=need–Al Gore needs attention…

  6. ..and in other news, Steve Jobs seething at the award has called for an improptu gathering of trusted media October 31st. It is believed that Phil Schiller will be awarding his Steveness with his own Nobel iPeace Prize.

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