Apple shares hit new all-time high – again

Shares of Apple Inc. today surged $2.869, or 1.87% to close at $156.339 on volume of 29,819,361 shares to set a new all-time closing high.

In after hours action, Apple shares currently stand up $0.07 at $156.41.

Apple’s previous 52-week high was $155.00, set on September 26th. Apple’s 52-week low is $72.60, set on October 11, 2006.

At market close, Apple’s market value stands at $135,958,804,299. For reference, Apple’s market value exceeds that of Hewlett-Packard by $4,556,203,539, surpasses Dell by $72,467,192,999, is greater than Sony by $84,476,982,739, and tops the value of Gateway by a mere $135,256,357,339.

AAPL quote via NASDAQ here.

MacDailyNews Note: “I am putting a sell on Apple, the company that created the iPhone,” Laura Goldman, investment advisor, LSG Capital, May 21, 2007. AAPL closed at $111.98 that day.

34 Comments

  1. There are no rules, explicit or implicit, regarding the price of a share of stock for any company. This is why Google (GOOG) is aroun $580 today; and Berkshire-Hathaway is around $118,000 (Class A; there is Class B, without voting rights, for about $4,000). The only reason a company would want to announce a stock split would be to make it psychologically less expensive, therefore, with more room to grow. The value remains the same, everything else remains the same. The reason Warren Buffet doesn’t believe in stock splits (which is why his BRK.A is so expensive) is that cheap stocks only bring in emotional investors, which together can swing the stock back and forth for no valid reason, other than fear and panic. How many of us here can afford over $100k for even one single share of his company?

    Steve Jobs recently said that they have no plans to split again. He seems to be taking a page from W. Buffet’s book, and he is right.

    If this company continues to plug away as it has for the past four years, it will soon blow past Intel, IBM and Google ($154B, $160B and 170B, respectively).

    And, on that note, today, MSFT stands at $280B. In perspective: MSFT has been around $280B for the past five years. AAPL was at around $40B a year ago; it is now $135B. Any predictions here?

  2. “Are there any trading rules as to when a stock split is recommended? “

    People seem to think there is a rule or that because the stock split at price X before, certainly it will split again at the same price. Or if it’s so high, then it must be time for a split. Splits usually happen to make the stock more attractive to investors and usually when the compay has a positive outlook. But there is no requirement that at a certain price the stock has to split for instance Berkshire Hathaway A shares are currently trading at about $118,000 EACH… for one … ONE share.

    for more info try reading:
    http://www.investopedia.com/articles/01/072501.asp

  3. “What advantages are there to letting the stock price keep rising?”

    Oh yeah and one of the primary advantages is stability. The cheaper the per share price the easier it is for entry level investors to get involved therefore potentially creating more volatility in the stock.

  4. “Steve Jobs recently said that they have no plans to split again. He seems to be taking a page from W. Buffet’s book, and he is right.”

    No, he knows the stock will soon be trading below $100 again. No need to split.

  5. “The cheaper the per share price the easier it is for entry level investors to get involved therefore potentially creating more volatility in the stock.”

    Sure, like “Entry level Investors” are responsible for most of the volume with any stock on any given day.

  6. “Sure, like “Entry level Investors” are responsible for most of the volume with any stock on any given day.”

    Entry level investors also include day traders and yes they can have an effect on the price. People who trade volume of stocks based on small gains or losses are contributing to the volatility and many traditional investors would classify day traders as just sucha group.

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