Positive iPhone reviews may mean last chance to buy Apple shares under $120

“Today may well have been your last chance to buy shares of Apple for under $120. The first reviews of the iPhone (by journalists actually allowed to test the device) were published on the Web at 3 p.m. PDT today and seem to be generally positive, with the typical caveats about Apple’s choice of cellphone carriers. Interestingly, some of the issues that were initially cause for concern seem to have fallen by the wayside. Indeed, two of the three reviewers below actually seem fond of the device’s virtual keyboard and all of them found its new screen to be durable,” John Paczkowski reports for AllThingsD.

MacDailyNews Note: That’s because Pogue is a spaz. It only took Walt Mossberg a few days; Pogue will get the hang of the iPhone keyboard sometime by late summer/early fall.

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “LinuxGuy and Mac Prodigal Son” for the heads up.]

MacDailyNews Note: By the way, as Paczkowski notes via link in his article, that piece of garbage “First Review” of Apple iPhone that appeared in the NY Post yesterday was by hack Glenn Fleishman who was not one of those allowed two weeks with Apple iPhone. Some “review.” The real reviews of note, of which there are four so far, come from people who had actual access to iPhone for real long-term hands-on testing and are listed in the “Related articles” below.

29 Comments

  1. The enterprise IT boys are running scared already. I got this email at work TODAY. Can someone help me debunk these talking points?

    =====================================
    Subject: iPhone

    On June 29, 2007, Apple will be releasing the iPhone, a device that combines three technologies into one: widescreen iPod, mobile phone and internet communications. The iPhone is creating quite a buzz in the consumer wireless space. We are beginning to receive questions about future adoption and support for employees and agents. It is the enterprise position that we will not be adopting the Apple iPhone for a number of reasons, including but not limited to:

    The iPhone does not include administration tools such as password management and other minimum security settings needed to secure the device to our enterprise standards.

    The iPhone will not synchronize with Microsoft Outlook Exchange or IBM Lotus Notes.

    The iPhone is being targeted towards the consumer and the iPod user base.

    The iPhone per AT&T internal policy cannot be sold to enterprise accounts.

    AT&T Wireless has the exclusive distribution rights to this product for the first five years, limiting its use to their markets.

    The iPhone utilizes the Apple Macintosh Operating System which has limited support at XXXXXX.

  2. Put your hands over your ears and start saying, “La la la la la la la la… I can’t hear you… la la la la…” really loudly.

    Then run out of the room crying. Maybe they’ll cave.

  3. @someone
    Just buy one, and stand around in places where your senior management might congregate and show it off…

    ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”grin” style=”border:0;” />

    Seriously, when companies are recruiting, people are going to ask them “can i use my iphone?” and when the answer is no, they will decline an interview…

  4. MDN, if what the dude called someone just posted is correct, then I think it deserves a headline and an opportunity to be debunked. If the iPhone can get pooped at version 1 when all its competition is 10 years old and still can’t compete, then this IT perfect example really deserves to get pooped by some people who have a clue.
    Jump on it, MDN!

  5. This is the funniest email I have ever seen.
    The only one item that appears to be of substantial relevance is the outlook exchange item. As reported the iphone supports exchange. Besides, why do they need to be involved. Just ask the IT people the simple questions that come up on the phone for mail and keep them out of your life.

    This is all just bizarre since none of the email is relevant to most things IT related. The ATT internal policy can not be sold to entreprise accounts? What the @#$@% does that mean? I am an IT guy and this is really a wierd statement.

    The Iphone is targeted to consumers……um no it is targeted to a person with a brain and fingers. Again a device that makes you more productive is a tool. I wonder if this same person does not allow pens and pencils, since children use them.

    This phone is a computer. What standards are they talking about. the browser supports https……..I think someone needs to sit down with the writer of this email and go over exactly which items and features on the phone are a problem and why. I think then clarity that the phone is fine and safe as a lap top will evolve.

  6. Glenn Fleishmann appears to have confused the iPhone as being in some way a replacement for a Laptop. If you have a genuine need for a lapto – with the accompanying screen size – whilst you’re out and about then get a laptop. Of course and iPhone, or any other phone isn’t going to be suitable. You have to always make considerations for what a device is going to be used for. People aren’t going to spend hours surfing on the iPhone, they’re going to check the news, look something specific up, that sort of thing.

  7. Once CEO “consumers” start using the iPhone, they will question their IT departments and then demand that the iPhone be supported.

    IT folks that don’t want to support Apple products are just lazy.

    I suggest that they be replaced by someone that isn’t afraid of the future – perhaps someone that is educated to Apple servers etc… as well as MS products.

  8. Thank you someone, look at the marketing the IT people are doing. Let’s read between the lines (BTL):

    “The iPhone does not include administration tools such as password management and other minimum security settings needed to secure the device to our enterprise standards.”

    BTL: That means you will have to use it independantly until we change our enterprise standards.

    The iPhone will not synchronize with Microsoft Outlook Exchange or IBM Lotus Notes.

    BTL: But it does IMAP just fine. We know about it, but don’t want to let you know, cause then we really want to fix things that break down often.

    The iPhone is being targeted towards the consumer and the iPod user base.

    BTL: Since all of your are consumers and most of you are part of the iPod user base, this means you.

    The iPhone per AT&T internal policy cannot be sold to enterprise accounts.

    BTL: You will have to go buy one on your own.

    AT&T Wireless has the exclusive distribution rights to this product for the first five years, limiting its use to their markets.

    BTL: Time to drop Sprint.

    The iPhone utilizes the Apple Macintosh Operating System which has limited support at XXXXXX.

    BTL: This will probably be fixed once the current IT department is replaced.

    This is great marketing by the IT folks. Thank you so very much. Keep circulating that email, actually I think this is the first Apple “open virus”.

    Open virus: A computer virus where the viral code is the actual email message and not inserted as an attachment or “hidden”. The open virus does not seeks not to destroy or hinder an individual computer, but rather attacks the entire platform through the individual computer user.

    I like it.

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