Tiger’s evolution continues: Apple preps Mac OS X 10.4.10 update

Apple Store“With the release of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard pushed back to October, Apple has bought itself more time to tie loose ends in the current Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger operating system and will put forth those fixes via its first ‘dot ten’ software update in quite some time, AppleInsider has learned,” Kasper Jade and Katie Marsal report for AppleInsider.

The Mac maker hopes to stabilize the software to the point where it can begin seeding copies of the software update externally to its thousands of Apple Developer Connection members as early as next week,” Jade and Marsal report. “Apple may also tap the impending Tiger update to lend software support to an upcoming series of Mac hardware updates that will include refreshed MacBook Pro notebooks and redesigned 20- and 24-inch iMac all-in-one desktop systems.”

“Apple last updated Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger in March, when it released Mac OS X 10.4.9 ,” Jade and Marsal report.

Full article here.

51 Comments

  1. Yea sure little resulted in little malware, just because of the low market share and virtually no Mac’s in the more corrupt areas of the world.

    How many times in this forum this myth has to be debunked, I wonder.

    There are MORE than ENOUGH Mac OS X users to create virus and malware for the platform.

    There are virus around for BeOS, OS/2, Debian, Linux and even for the 300 users or so in the world that had installed a special version of Linux twisted to fit in an iPod. THREE HUNDRED and it is probably even too big a figure.

    There are virus and malware for OSes having 0.1 to 0.5 market share.
    Mac OS X has over 6% market share (on Quarter sales, user base is >10% if one counts in statistics of internet browsing)

    So, oh infinitely dumb, explain why an OS with 0.1% market share has malware for it and not an OS with over 6%, Mac OS X.

    It’s because it is MORE difficult, stupid. Not because of the number of users.
    If it can be done IT IS DONE ALREADY, even with 10 user base, just for the heck of it.

    Could this message ever get through the fog of lobsters’ brain ever?

  2. Um…. 10.4.1 != 10.4.10

    If we were talking pure decimals, then yes. As soon as you add a second floating point to the number, it’s no longer a decimal number. DUH!

  3. These noobs that think that software version numbers follow the normal decimal system make me laugh.

    MDN: “life”, as in, get one!

    —-
    On topic, I am looking forward both to 10.4.10 and an updated iMac lineup. I have one of the first 20″ Core Duo iMacs, and I love it. Now looking to go to the 24″!

  4. There are MORE than ENOUGH Mac OS X users to create virus and malware for the platform.

    YES BUT, most all of the malware writers are in areas of the world where they either can’t get or can afford a Mac.

    Remember the Mac OS comes with a pretty hefty hardware cost, unlike the billions of pirated versions of Windows.

    Malware writers are doing so for profit, to get spam bots. Windows is the most in market share, so it’s targeted the most.

    By the way there has been Mac OS X and Linux botnets, reguardless how they got in, they did. It’s the operating systems makers responsibility to make sure it’s OS is secure, NO MATTER WHAT PROGRAMS IT’S RUNNING.

    Because 95% of exploits are in third party code and Apple fails miserably on this aspect of computer security.

    Security has to come from the top down, not the bottom up.

    If your running as admin and/or installed apps using your admin password, your a complete and utter fool.

    Set up another admin user, log out and into that new admin user. Set the old admin user as a regular user.

    It’s not good enought to protect against flaws in thrid party code that you installed using your admin password, but it should help keep your box more secure.

    Don’t use software that demands admin passwords to install.

  5. > YES BUT, most all of the malware writers are in areas of the world where they either can’t get or can afford a Mac.

    Nonsense. Windows gets hacked because Windows is easy to hack. Even if you could hack into Mac OS X, the exploit would not result the type of access to the Mac that is worth the effort. With Windows, a hack gives you “ownership” of the computer and turns it into a ‘bot. Even if Mac OS X market share was equal to Windows market share, hackers would go after Windows. And there are plenty of hackers all over the world.

  6. Grain. Of. Salt.

    PS: 10.4.10 = 10.4.1
    The addition of a zero after a number after a point is meaningless.

    10.4.1
    Already been done.

    Actually, a second decimal point in a number is meaningless too. Because 10.4.10, 10.4.1, 10.3.8, 9.2.2 etc. are not actually numbers. They’re labels. The latest update could just as easily be “J.D.J” or “X.IV.X” or “blorg.snurgle.wheem”. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”smile” style=”border:0;” />

  7. Nonsense. Windows gets hacked because Windows is easy to hack.

    Funny, records show that Mac OS X has had more exploits recently than Windows.

    Even if you could hack into Mac OS X, the exploit would not result the type of access to the Mac that is worth the effort.

    Apparantly you haven’t been tracking how severe Mac OS X’s exploit potential has been.

    With Windows, a hack gives you “ownership” of the computer and turns it into a ‘bot.

    Ditto for Mac OS X, just takes a little longer depending on the exploit. For instance if I got only user, it would only be a matter of time before I got root.

    Have to enter that admin password sometime right?

    With a app exploit that has root level code, I’m in like flynn.

    Even if Mac OS X market share was equal to Windows market share, hackers would go after Windows. And there are plenty of hackers all over the world.

    If Mac OS X, in it’s present form, exactly switched places with Windows. Meaning if it was seperated from hardware and pirated all ove the world like Windows is, Mac OS X would be even more insecure than Windows is now.

    Why?

    Because Windows is now hardened and Mac OS X is not.

    Mac OS X exploit potentials have been increasing while Windows has been decreasing.

    Don’t take my word for it. See the truth for yourself.

    http://blogs.technet.com/security/archive/2006/10/17/2006-january-through-september-vulnerability-trends.aspx

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.