Microsoft patches Windows Vista to correct Apple iPod eject corruption

Apple Store“Today we’re publishing at the Microsoft Download Center a recommended final compatibility update for users of Windows Vista and the Apple iPod; this same update will be automatically available via Windows Update on Tuesday 22 May. The release is for users worldwide and works with the latest version of Apple iTunes to correct an issue that caused some iPods to become corrupted when ejecting them using Windows Explorer or the ‘Safely Remove Hardware’ function in the System Tray,” Nick White, Windows Vista Product Manager, writes for Microsoft’s Windows Vista Blog.

MacDailyNews Take: Anyone surprised that Microsoft’s “Safely Remove Hardware” option in Vista failed to safely remove hardware?

White explains, “The long and short of it is this: Apple and Windows have partnered together to ensure a great experience in using Windows Vista with iTunes and the iPod, and both companies recommend you download this update.”

Full article here.

More info and download links for the patches (x86-based or 64-bit Windows Vista) can be found here.

26 Comments

  1. MS did what it does, it hurt it’s consumers dragging it’s feet to hurt Apple. They just don’t give a crap about their consumers, and they wonder why people are defecting…

  2. When I first got my iPod 60gig, I plugged it into my Windows XP box (why, I can’t recall). Windows wouldn’t let go of it, and when I finally just shut Windows down and unplugged the iPod, the iPod was corrupt, so I had to reformat it. I have never, to this day, used it with a Windows machine. It only gets used with my Mac, which is as it should be. Actually, I rarely ever use that old PC anymore, for anything. Junk. (And it’s actually a very nice machine, for a non-Mac, that is).

  3. The real question is: Is anyone surprised that MS VISTA corrupts Apple products?

    MS is getting so desparate they’re now hoping to screw up peoples experience with Apple products just enough to taint it a bit – This tactic is especially useful when used against first time users of the iPod combined with MS OSes.

    Good going MS.

  4. About the patch: White explains, “The long and short of it is this: Apple and Windows…

    Wait. Windows Vista is made by The Windows Company?

    “…have partnered together…

    That can’t be good. Apple helped to work on a Windows patch?

    …to ensure a great experience in using Windows Vista with iTunes and the iPod…

    Windows Vista really doesn’t help. You can use the iTunes and iPod on XP with perhaps better results – no big “Quickly Corrupt Hardware” issues.

    Besides, it all runs better on a Mac.

    “…and both companies recommend you download this update.”

    Where’s Apple’s “Seal of Approval and Compliance to Microsoft Circumstances”? I know Microsoft’s “Seal of Approval and Compliance to Apple Circumstances” is a rotted granny smith, but is Apple’s design going to involve a chipped microchip?

    I really thought this would be a “perfect” moment for him to
    “show off” the Zune’s “capabilities” and pit it against a “portable digital media player” that’s been sold 100 million times or more. He could also “gloat” about the “brilliance” of Zune Marketplace, the sister software to the Zune.

    Microsoft’s goal for the Zune is to hit a million within a year of its release. Six months down, six to go, and at this rate Zune will surely die.

    MW: programs … remember that iTunes is not one of those Microsoft programs.

  5. “Today we’re publishing at the Microsoft Download Center a recommended final compatibility update for users of Windows Vista and the Apple iPod;

    Meaning that when the next screwup comes along, M$ won’t fix it, because this one is the final one.

  6. And once again, we have to ask ourselves what the difference is between a Microsoft Vista customer and, for example, Hillary Scott.

    And the answer is: when Hillary Scott wakes up in the morning, she knows she’s gonna get screwed in the ass, but at least she gets paid for it.

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