Apple new 8-core Mac Pro uses special 3GHz quad-core Intel Xeon version

Apple Store“Apple’s updated Mac Pro uses a special version of Intel’s Xeon workstation-class processor, the semiconductor company said in an e-mail note. The 3GHz quad-core CPU at the heart of the fastest system is currently an unannounced model that sits at the top of the company’s performance range and is presently used only by Apple,” Electronista reports.

Electronista reports, “The model in question is the Xeon X5365, according to additional comments by Intel’s Italian PR director Ruben Simpliciano. The chip currently outpaces the official fastest quad-core processor from Intel, the 2.66GHz Xeon 5355, while maintaining the 8MB of total level 2 cache and 1333MHz system bus of its predecessors.”

More details in the full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “LinuxGuy and Mac Prodigal Son” for the heads up.]

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25 Comments

  1. Octo Mac Pro, no OEM BlueRay DVD drive, no HD movies, lame.

    But I lust for all that power anyway.

    I’ll wait for the “Night of the Lepoard” and get 10% discount off the Mac Octo Pro monster.

    Hopefully by then we will get OEM BlueRay drives.

  2. If I was the boss at Intel I would make sure that Apple had the best of everything that the company makes – reason being how else is the boss going to be able ,to show off just what his company (Intel) can do

    He sure isn’t going to get that job done by relying on Dell or any of the other want to be companies out there.

    GOOD MOVE INTEL !

  3. It’s obvious the 3GHz Xeon 5365’s are the low yield “cream of the crop” of the massively produced and stable 2.66GHz Xeon 5355 models or Dell would have gotten them first.

    They 3GHz’s could run hotter than normal and if they fail, would require a replacement Mac Pro instead of a simple processor switch.

    Buy AppleCare when you get the Octo Pro.

  4. I know this is a dumb computer newbie question – but isn’t the speed of the machine limited by the bus that the chips is plugged into?

    In other words, if the chip processes at 3Ghz but the bus is limited to letting stuff go through at 1.6Ghz, isn’t it, in effect, a 1.6Ghz machine?

  5. OS X is the only OS out there that can keep up with the ever-changing and ever-improving hardware designs. Windows is too bloated and antiquated with backwards compatibility to be able to keep up. I bet Intel is glad to have Apple on their side finally so that they can show off their latest and greatest designs without having to wait a year for Microsoft to release a Service Pack.

  6. This is actually just “good business sense”. The “OctoMac” is likely to be a low-volume item. The top of the modestly-selling Power Mac line. Great for visibility, no need for high productivity. Chips that can’t hack the full speed can still try out for 2.66 status and be sold in Dells. Everyone wins. Except Dell … boo-hoo.

    DLMeyer – the Voice of G.L.Horton’s Stage Page pod-cast

  7. I know this is a dumb computer newbie question – but isn’t the speed of the machine limited by the bus that the chips is plugged into?

    In other words, if the chip processes at 3Ghz but the bus is limited to letting stuff go through at 1.6Ghz, isn’t it, in effect, a 1.6Ghz machine?

    The answer is both “yes” and “no!”. It depends on a number of factors.
    First thing is that most systems are most limited by their users/uses.
    Second thing is that most uses are not data-intensive.
    Third is the use of “cache RAM” everyone includes – L2 & L3.
    The first two work together, the third eliminates many of the problems faced by data-intensive tasks. I have Folding@Home running on this computer. Data-intensive, but totally contained in L2 cache, thus avoiding the bus entirely. It uses every cycle I don’t – and I never miss them because it always lets my pitiful usage go first.

    DLMeyer – the Voice of G.L.Horton’s Stage Page pod-cast

  8. “In other words, if the chip processes at 3Ghz but the bus is limited to letting stuff go through at 1.6Ghz, isn’t it, in effect, a 1.6Ghz machine?”
    Well that depends on how memory hungry the applications are and the width of the bus. If they produce alot of memory traffic then the cpu is limited by the frontside bus or the northbridge but if that was the case then you wouldn’t be able to utilice the cpu fully. I wouldn’t worry about it.
    You go ahead and sequence that human genome before lunch ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”wink” style=”border:0;” />
    I don’t like the memory tough, it would be great if it ran at the same or atleast half the fsb :/

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