New IBM software to help business to offer employees the choice of running Apple Macs

“IBM said on Sunday it will offer an open desktop software system for businesses that puts the cost of managing Apple or Linux computers on a more equal footing with Microsoft’s Windows software, improving the economics of Windows alternatives,” Reuters reports.

Reuters reports, “The product – which the company calls its ‘Open Client Offering’ – pulls together software IBM has developed in-house and with partners Novell and Red Hat to answer questions over the cost-effectiveness of managing Linux or Apple desktop PCs alongside Windows PCs.”

“International Business Machines said the new software makes it feasible for big businesses to offer their employees a choice of running Windows, Linux, or Apple Macintosh software on desktop PCs, using the same underlying software code. This cuts the costs of managing Linux or Apple relative to Windows,” Reuters reports.

Reuters reports, “IBM’s Open Client software chips away at long-time rival Microsoft’s Windows franchise by making it unnecessary for companies to pay Microsoft for licenses for operations that no longer rely on Windows-based software. The move comes as corporate decision-makers have begun to mull when it makes sense to upgrade to Microsoft’s Windows Vista.”

“IBM plans to use its ‘Open Client’ software initially to run some 5 percent of desktop computers across its own organization, which employs around 320,000 staff worldwide,” Reuters reports. “Customer call centers and software development groups in Brazil, India, Europe and other IBM offices will take part. Pockets of Apple computer users within IBM also will be supported for the first time by Open Client.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Dion” for the heads up.]

MacDailyNews Take: Chipping away, chipping away.

19 Comments

  1. “… puts the cost of managing Apple or Linux computers on a more equal footing with Microsoft’s Windows software… “

    So… they are going to make it more difficult and expensive to manage Apple and Linux computers? WTF?

  2. More than ever, they seem weaker, less able, and with less friends. Stick a fork in ’em, they’re done!

    Kidding aside, maybe all the hits they’ve been taking lately will make them a better company. Seems more and more unlikely though…

  3. I’m all for IBM sticking it to Mr. Softy, but I think this will help linux distros more than apple. A company can take their existing computers/networks, install linux on them, and then use IBM’s software. I see this as a more likely prospect than a company running out and buying new mac systems. If a company that has been using PC’s and windows for ten years wants to run out and buy new systems, their IT guys will guide them to new Dells or the like.

    Now, I could see small companies using it to allow individual employees to bring their personal mac systems to work.

    Once the other employees see the new Mac at work, they may clamor for Macs once their current boxes die.

    Or, at least we can always hope.

  4. I’ve lived long enough to see the first real cracks in the armor of MS enterprise ridiculousness – No I can die happy, knowing the world can be a better place if it will just decide to. MS solutions should have always been a choice and not a requirement.

  5. It may help Linux, but it will also help Apple keep the desktops they already have. Also, as Apple gains marketshare in the consumer space, more employees will ask if they can use a Mac at work. IBM’s product will give one less reason for the IT folks to justify “banning” Macs at the workplace. And it’s probably the higher-level executives at large companies who want to be seen with a 17″ MacBook Pro instead of a monstrosity from HP or Dell.

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