Apple CEO Steve Jobs talks Macs, iPods, competitors’ copying, Motorola ROKR and more

At today’s Apple Expo in Paris, Apple CEO Steve Jobs held a frank Q&A and “explained the company’s motivation on not discussing future products. ‘Microsoft is copying our operating system,’ he said, adding, ‘Dell is copying our hardware. They just have to follow our tail lights,’ he smiled,” Macworld UK reports. Jobs also discusses iPod nano and what Apple thinks of the idea of Bluetooth-enable iPods in the full article here.

As for the Mac platform, “Apple continues to enjoy significant growth. Commenting on this, Jobs nodded at the European market, saying: ‘Our market has doubled in size and Europe has been a big part of that.’ Apple’s leader confirmed that Apple’s US market share now stands at 4.5 per cent, with a global share of 3 per cent,” Macworld UK reports. “Jobs also confirmed Apple’s switch to Intel processors remains on schedule.” Interestingly, Macworld UK reports that Jobs said that the iPod was the first Apple product to get into the hands of millions of people. It is unclear is that is a direct quote by Jobs or if Jobs’ comments were paraphrased by Macworld UK. Obviously, Apple Macs are already in the hands of tens of millions of people. Full article here.

“Asking: ‘Why have we been able to maintain our position?,’ Jobs pointed to Apple’s secret success sauce. ‘The iPod looks like a piece of hardware, but it’s not. It’s software. And iTunes is the best jukebox and iTunes Music Store is the best digital music distribution service… And this is the secret, he stressed. Apple’s ‘whole widget’ approach to music is its strength. It produces the software, the devices and the store. ‘No other company does it all,’ he said, ‘The PC ecosystem where one company makes the hardware another makes the software doesnt work, we do all of them,’ he added. Jobs also commented on recent reports indicating Microsoft and Creative to own patents that relate to Apple’s iPod. He dismissed these reports as ‘lazy reporting.’ He also noted that Apple’s iPod constitutes ‘prior art:’ ‘We have lots of iPod patents. Microsoft filed its patent months after we launched the iPod,’ he said,” Macworld UK reports. Full article here.

“Jobs confirmed his company’s work with Motorola to produce the ROKR iTunes phone was a learning experience for his engineers. ‘We wrote the iTunes software for that phone,’ he said. ‘We see it as something we can learn from. It was a way to put our toe in the water, and learn something,’ he said. Asked about the phones limited 100-song storage capacity, Jobs said: ‘I can’t answer questions on other people’s products,'” Macworld UK reports. “Discussing video on mobile phones and iPods, Jobs confirmed some moves in that direction, but stressed that the market isn’t yet right for personal video devices, such as the much-posited video iPod. ‘You can already download movies on the iTunes Music Store, and some albums offer video as an incentive to buy the music. We also offer video podcasts, but will people buy a video device just to watch this video? So far they haven’t. No one has been successful with that yet,’ he said.” Full article here.
That poor ROKR. It’s Apple iPod’s red-headed stepchild.

31 Comments

  1. “Interestingly, Macworld UK reports that Jobs said that the iPod was the first Apple product to get into the hands of millions of people. It is unclear is that is a direct quote by Jobs or if Jobs’ comments were paraphrased by Macworld UK. Obviously, Apple Macs are already in the hands of tens of millions of people.”

    I think he means that, for millions of people, this was their first Apple product. Obviously millions of us have been enjoying Apple Macs for quite a few years, but many of those purchasing iPods are new to the Apple fold.

  2. Thanks Steve, for vindicating me!!

    Steve said “‘We wrote the iTunes software for that phone,’ he said. ‘We see it as something we can learn from. It was a way to put our toe in the water, and learn something,’ he said.

    I wrote in an earlier post..

    “If anything, we should be happy that Apple gets to work out any potential bugs at the expense of someone else. This way, Apple does nothing to their image as they may have if they had released a phone of their own that was not up to the standards that we (and the rest of the world) have come to expect. Could you imagine the negative press ?!! Those guys are salivating while they wait for Apple to make a wrong move.”

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  3. A couple of points:
    1) Steve said,“…It’s not clear that buying music over the air makes economic sense”, he said, adding: “People only use 5 per cent of the features on their mobiles” If you want to be a leader, be a learner. Job’s command of the facts in so many directions tells me he is constantly looking for and absorbing info to help him do his job better. We should learn from that.

    2) He also said, “I don’t think the convergence of television and computer is going to happen” I agree insofar as the human/computer interface and organizational models remain unchanged. I believe that those models must change over time as technology allows and that some day the informational aspects of TV will blend with computing. I do agree that traditional TV entertainment and computer use don’t blend well at all today. Even mindless PC gaming is more demanding than plopping down on the couch to watch educational TV.

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