IT specialists: Bill Gates ‘had greatest impact on business computing in the past half century’

“Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates has another trophy to place on his mantelpiece. Gates, who turns 50 in October, was voted the person who has ‘had the greatest impact on business computing in the past half century’ in a poll of IT specialists. The poll was conducted by the IBM Share user group celebrating its 50th anniversary this week in Boston,” TechWeb News reports. “Gates captured 55 percent of the votes while Tom Watson, Jr. collected 40 percent and IBM computer developer Gene Amdahl had 39 percent. Amdahl went on to build plug-compatible mainframes for his own company.”

“Thirty-one percent of the respondents chose Internet pioneer Tim Berners-Lee, followed by Texas Instruments chip innovator Jack Kilby, 22 percent, and software pioneer Grace Hopper, 19 percent. Linux innovator Linus Torvalds was further down the list with 10 percent followed by Apple Computer’s Steve Jobs with 8 percent. The base 444 number of respondents picked several persons each in the poll,” TechWeb News reports. “Ironically perhaps, information security was the top emerging trend concerning IT workers, an issue often linked to flaws in Gates’ software. Of the 444 individuals voting, 31 percent marked security as the top issue confronting them for the remainder of the decade.”

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Gates has certainly had an impact on business computing alright. One can only wonder how productivity would be affected if the business world embraced Mac OS X instead of Microsoft’s backwards and upside down Mac wannnabe OS? One thing’s for sure, Symantec would be hatin’ life.

34 Comments

  1. I’d be willing to bet they were all MCSE’s too. I agree that Gates has had the greatest impact. He is responsible for stifling so much technology from competitors, who knows where we could be right now if it weren’t for Bill. It’s kind of like an article I read years ago about the steam engine and how it was originally invented about 2,000 years ago, but no one could really figure out anything to do with it. The article stated that, if they had, the industrial revolution could have happened within that century and technology would be that much more advanced today.

    Congrats Bill! You deserve it!

  2. now now people. technically, you cannot argue with the merits of the point raised.

    that said, what gates excelled at was not technology creation per se, but marketing and distribution of existing ideas. windows has never broken new ground in terms of technology and unfortunately now that is entrenched, it could spit in a bucket and people would fawn over it.

    i like my mac just fine.

    one day it’ll all make sense for windows users.

  3. “Gates, who turns 50 in October, was voted the person who has ‘had the greatest impact on business computing in the past half century’ in a poll ofIT specialists.
    ———
    Well, look who they surveyed: corporate IT guys who owe their careers to Gates. If I spent all day patching holes in that Swiss cheese MS calls an OS, I’d be grateful too. Those guys know who butters their bread. (Sorry for all the food references — is it lunchtime yet?)

    Darn it, where’s Sputnik to tell us what life is like in “the real IT world”? I miss that guy.

  4. Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
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    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!
    Hey! It looks like you’re writing a letter!

    Greatest impact on business can likely also be proven by statistics on crippling strokes that occur in the workplace.

    http://www.msboycott.com/media/ms_office-f_off_clippy.mpg

  5. It makes you wonder on what basis his “impact” is predicated.

    Couldn’t be on DOS, he bought that from someone else.

    Couldn’t be Windows, he plagiarized (or stole, depending on your depth of feeling) that from Apple.

    MS Mail: acquired. Powerpoint: acquired. FoxPro: acquired.

    IE: rubbish.

    So it must be Word (which was never as good as WordPerfect whilst that product was alive) or Excel.

    Because surely nobody would give him this honour based on the rat’s nest of security flaws that is Outlook, Exchange and Outlook Express.

  6. his impact is based on marketing and distribution. he took the software modus operundi and learned how to squeeze every drop from it.

    can’t fault him for that. his OS does suck donkey chunks tho and Longvista will suck too. Hence, why Linux r0x0rs.

  7. He bought his OS (CPM), ripped off Apple (Windows), ripped off Corel (Word), ripped off Netscape (IE), and engaged in all manner of illegal and anti-competitive business practices. He is the father of the booming anti-virus and anti-spyware business. Yeah, he’s had a great effect.

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