Apple CEO Steve Jobs’ ultimate goal: ‘to take back the computer business from Microsoft’

“‘True to his prediction, Apple Chief Executive and co-founder Steve Jobs returned to work a little more than a month after his surgery for pancreatic cancer in August 2004,” Cecil Johnson writes for Knight Ridder. “Jeffrey S. Young and William L. Simon, co-authors of ‘iCon Steve Jobs: The Greatest Second Act in the History of Business,’ describe the recuperating Jobs as exuding enthusiasm and being closed-mouthed about the ordeal, ‘The reason for Steve’s returning to work so quickly after surgery became clear in a few months: Apple was building a collection of new products that was designed to play off the success of the iPod, chasing after an outlandish Stevian dream: to take back the computer business from Microsoft.'”

Johnson writes, “Reflecting on Jobs’ achievements, the authors point out that 11 years after being forced out of Apple, Jobs returned and rescued it from a downward spiral, led Pixar to produce a string of animated movies that captivated parents and children, and revitalized the music industry and catapulted it into a digital future. ‘Yet there’s one more battle he wants to win. It has nothing to do with money, fame, or glory. Like all the best fights, this one is personal. Steve Jobs is going to best Bill Gates. This fight is Shakespearean, elemental, and emotional; watching it unfold should be the most fascinating business story of this young millennium,’ Young and Simon write.”

Full article here.

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83 Comments

  1. Bob: “nimrod”

    C’mon now Bobby, it’s hard to take you serious when you stoop like that. Do you have anything useful to say or do you always resort to name-calling?

    Once again… have a nice day. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”smile” style=”border:0;” />

  2. Bob: “nimrod”

    C’mon now Bobby, it’s hard to take you serious when you stoop like that. Do you have anything useful to say or do you always resort to name-calling?

    Once again… have a nice day. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”smile” style=”border:0;” />

  3. Bob: “nimrod”

    C’mon now Bobby, it’s hard to take you serious when you stoop like that. Do you have anything useful to say or do you always resort to name-calling?

    Once again… have a nice day. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”smile” style=”border:0;” />

  4. >M wrote: Stealing from Peter to make ‘donations’ to Paul IS NOT philanthropy.

    He stole from a guy named Peter? ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”raspberry” style=”border:0;” />

    Billions even. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”raspberry” style=”border:0;” />

    And he gave billions to one guy named Paul. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”raspberry” style=”border:0;” />

    Great argument.

  5. >M wrote: Stealing from Peter to make ‘donations’ to Paul IS NOT philanthropy.

    He stole from a guy named Peter? ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”raspberry” style=”border:0;” />

    Billions even. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”raspberry” style=”border:0;” />

    And he gave billions to one guy named Paul. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”raspberry” style=”border:0;” />

    Great argument.

  6. >M wrote: Stealing from Peter to make ‘donations’ to Paul IS NOT philanthropy.

    He stole from a guy named Peter? ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”raspberry” style=”border:0;” />

    Billions even. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”raspberry” style=”border:0;” />

    And he gave billions to one guy named Paul. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”raspberry” style=”border:0;” />

    Great argument.

  7. You guys should all place bets and see who wins in say, 5 years ….

    Kinda like the stock market ….. That place where people are paid well or punished dearly for their analysis.

    Grow a pair and put your money where your mouth is.

  8. I personally like the freedom of choice from Bill Gates. He just locked down and monopolized the software, but EVERYBODY ELSE makes the hardware. I wouldn’t be caught dead with a MacBook and make myself look like a little Latte sipping, Elitist, Artsy Craftsy, soft, supple and Stuck up Mac user. I went to buy a MacBook, but the salesmen were always a turn-off and I bought a Vaio….just my style. But I have been able to get OSX on my Vaio and I am quite comfortable using a laptop with the look of buisnessMAN(hence I am male and want to stay looking that way) and still using Tiger.

    The day that Steve Jobs gives me that choice, he wont win me. Until then, I will always look at him as a monopolizing hippie still having bad acid trips every so once in awhile giving him his occasional satisfaction of his own little “winning” world.

  9. “philanthropy” –>

    Well, that is a strange topic, but since we on this one here is my two cents (pence, yen, euro cent or whatever);

    Bill Gates and philanthropy;

    First, it’s not hard to be a philanthropist when you have that kind of money and desperately need massive tax write-offs and want to leave some kind of legacy (which he can afford to do).

    Second, as far as philanthropy, I would much rather have the country decide how best to use the funds than an individual. I’m not saying Bill Gates is not doing good things with the money, but why should a single person make that decision. That kind of money ought to be a societal decision. We get outraged when government spends that kind of money on things without oversight and accountability and some say. Yet, a person who makes all their money off of a society get to choose individually as to how best to give back to society.

    Whether you believe Mr & Mrs. Gates to be smart, good programmers, good business people or itelligent or not, one thing is most probably certain. I seriously doubt they are so educated in Sociology, Economics, Psychology, Engineering, Biology, Chemistry, Educational Sciences and so forth as to be the most qualified to decided for the rest of the world as to what causes get funds and how to implement it.

    So, if you leave society out of the equation in your philanthropy quest you are pretty much not going to have any lasting impact that really could have made change for the better.

    Third, philanthropy from a guy who runs a massive royalties for stock pictures company, a monopolistic software company, bought Da Vinci sketches instead of allowing a museum (the people) to own them, and so forth? How to see how even if he gave back ever single dime his dynasty sucked out of society and the damage it has caused that what little generoscity his posses would qualify as philanthropy.

    Thank you.

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