Apple Macs are far easier, cost less to manage than Windows boxes

“Last month, Brandchannel.com dubbed Apple Computer Inc. the ‘brand with the most global impact.’ But you’d never know it by looking at corporate desktops today,” Mark Hall writes for Computerworld. “Windows machines are the undisputed personal computers of choice for corporate IT, the biggest single market for PCs. Research conducted by Framingham, Mass.-based IDC underscores the fact. IDC ranked the maker of Macintosh machines No. 10 on its market-share list in 2004, two spots behind the Chinese company Lenovo Group Ltd.—and the list was prepared before Lenovo’s planned acquisition of IBM’s PC unit.”

Hall writes, “Yet despite significant efforts by Windows suppliers, Apple still remains a dominant player in vertical market segments such as publishing and digital media. And with the growing popularity of its low-cost Xserve Unix servers, Apple has an opportunity to compete head-to-head with industry leaders like Dell Inc. inside the data center for general-purpose applications such as e-mail and Web serving.”

“At Genentech Inc., a multibillion-dollar biotechnology firm in South San Francisco, Mark Jeffries oversees nearly 2,500 Macs. The senior systems specialist says the OS X machines are used ‘for various purposes,’ from scientists doing pure research to executives toying with spreadsheets,” Hall writes. “According to Jeffries, the Mac’s place in the market today is the result in large measure to Windows-centric IT shops that ‘have always been trying to find some reason to get rid of Macs.'”

“Most Mac technical support personnel argue that the machines are far simpler to manage than Windows boxes. For example, when Genentech went through a recent upgrade on both its Mac and Windows systems, one technician could completely upgrade six OS X machines per day, while on the Windows side, one person could complete only two or sometimes three PCs each day. And for the entire company, seven technicians handle nearly 2,500 Macintoshes,” Hall writes. “Eighty percent of Digital Strata Inc.’s business is Windows users. Dan Fischler, president of the Scotts Valley, Calif.-based IT consultancy, estimates that one tech support person can manage 50 to 75 Macs, whereas ideally, there should be one for every 20 to 25 Windows PCs.”

Hall writes, “No one expects Macs to displace Windows as the desktop of choice for general-purpose computing. But Apple has deflected intense competition in its core vertical markets. And, for the first time, it’s becoming a credible contender as an alternative for servers inside the data center.”

Full article here.

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23 Comments

  1. This story is so in the face of those idiots who said that Macs in the corporate world were irrelevant. Although this story says that the Windows PC might never be replaced as the desktop of choice, Isriously think, that once companies have gone the XServe route, they will seriously consider macs when the time comes to upgrade their PCs.

    With this bit of info, it has become evident that Apple’s strategy is to gain inroads through the home computer user, by offering a convincing entry level mac, and then to change the existing server policy and install Mac Servers, then meeting in the middle and giving the Dulls and Microschrotts of this world something to think about.

    Brought to you by the magic word of “green”, As in the others are becoming green with envy.

  2. The idea that an Apple will replace the default standard based hardware and software offered by Microsoft is just not conceivable.

    The “real IT world” is built around the superior products and services that Windows offers. We have invested our entire existence on this plat form – we are not going to recommend a sub-standard solution.

    We need the .NET framework and the 64 bit Longhorn server OS. Apple has nothing to offer the enterprise.

    No Network Tools
    No System Admin Tools
    and Nothing that even comes close to .NET

    Apple actually has to use .NET to run its I-Tunes music store.

    You may think the rules are changing but we in the “real IT world” are still calling the shots, and we are not going to allow any OS that doesn’t even have a built in anti-virus protection. (Longhorn does and XP SP 3.2.1 will too.)

    ©

  3. Hooray! Sputnick’s back. We’ve really missed you. Come on, tell us, why so long. Were you doing time, in rehab, or trying to install Service Pack 2?

  4. Sputni…. ha ha, sputn, Bwah ha ha, he said… hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah No wait, did he really say 64 bit longhorn server? ROFLMAO, almost blew dr. pepper out my nose onto the iBook…. hahahahahahahahaha .WHAT running the iTMS?

    Wow, welcome back Sputnik, it seems I was in serious need of some laugh therapy. Thanks!

    On the other hand, you sound so much like our email admin that its scary. “It doesn’t matter if we cannot keep it up 75% of the time, we have always used, now use, and always will use Groupwise”

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