Apple leads Wi-Fi space while late-to-the-Wi-Fi-party Intel stumbles

Intel’s soon-to-be-released Pentium-powered computers with new ‘Grantsdale’ innards will boast updated capabilities. Along with more powerful video, audio and data-storage features, the next-generation PCs will be more Wi-Fi capable,” Julio Ojeda-Zapata writes for The St. Paul Pioneer Press.

“In essence, such PCs will double as Wi-Fi transceivers, potentially eliminating the need for standalone ‘access points’ that now serve as typical hubs of wireless-network activity in a home. Though a wave of Grantsdale-capable PCs is expected in coming weeks, Intel says the wireless feature won’t take hold until later this year because a required add-on component won’t be widely deployed until then. ‘This delay is another major stumble for Intel, which came late to the Wi-Fi party with Centrino,’ said Glenn Fleishman on the Wi-Fi Networking News weblog,” Ojeda-Zapata writes.

“Still, the implications for home Wi-Fi use are profound. Macintosh users already are able to turn their computers into ‘soft’ access points with a few mouse clicks, allowing any other Wi-Fi capable Mac or Windows computer within range to get on the Internet or swap files at high speeds. Standalone access points won’t go away. In fact, Apple Computer is getting attention for its soon-to-be-released AirPort Express device, a miniaturized access point that plugs directly into an electrical outlet instead of taking up space on a desk or shelf,” Ojeda-Zapata writes.

“In addition to linking up Macs and PCs, the AirPort Express device will add a home stereo to a Wi-Fi network. Digital music stored on a computer can then be transmitted over the wireless network and played on the stereo’s speakers,” Ojeda-Zapata writes. “‘The Apple product is phenomenally useful,’ said said Chris Shipley, organizer of the influential DEMO technology conferences.”

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: We’ve been using Wi-Fi since July 1999, thanks to Apple’s Airport. Or for just about five years now. Today, we still meet Windows users who are utterly amazed at the technology that we have grown so used to that we don’t even think about it. As we’ve been known to write, “Apple leads. Wintel follows. As usual.

18 Comments

  1. Great article. yea i can relate to winbloze users who are are amazed each time i pop open my Ibook (1GhZ!!) and just hop on a wireless network. I guess i take this feauture for granted sometimes as well…Thanks apple

  2. The leadership and cutting edge technology will allow Intel and Microsoft the tools to bring wireless networking to the masses.

    This is a awesome and amazing; life in the year 2004…

  3. I can’t wait til the WWDC later this month. It will be like a time machine for windozers. They will be able to see what things will be like for them in 2009.

  4. Sorry there were a couple of typos in the earlier post. It should read:

    “The leadership and cutting edge technology will allow Apple the tools to bring wireless networking to the forward-thinking.

    This is a awesome and amazing; life in the year 2002…”

  5. This will set off a whole new round of security concerns. While home users love WiFi, many businesses are leery about it, and US Govt won’t use it all. Potentially the largest spenders in the PC market (buisiness) won’t even touch this technology for quite some time. With all of the lovely holes in Windows security, I’m not sure if I’d want this in my home or not either….

  6. Security concerns for PC users, yeah, but more free access points for Mac users with Airport cards! I have yet to find an un-protected Airport Base Station access point – but hoo-boy – the number of linksys and other routers out there just begging to be jumped on will only increase now. Hopefully Intel will FORCE the user to set a WEP password upon installation, but it doesn’t seem all that likely at this point.

  7. I just read the article, and it ends with a comment from Enderle – argh, I hate the way he has his fingers in the pie! It made an otherwise good article, rather ordinary.

  8. quote “This will set off a whole new round of security concerns. While home users love WiFi, many businesses are leery about it, and US Govt won’t use it all. Potentially the largest spenders in the PC market (buisiness) won’t even touch this technology for quite some time. With all of the lovely holes in Windows security, I’m not sure if I’d want this in my home or not either….

    Well ‘BAGGSS’ – If you used a mac this wouldn’t concern you!!

    As Macs come with a built-in firewall and if you use an airport extreme basestation that comes with a firewall too – also if you use DEMON for broadband access, like me, then that comes with a firewall and is wireless broadband with a fixed IP address – so now one can access your wireless broadband connection!!

    God I love MACS – SO SECURE, VIRUS FREE, EASY TO USE, CUTTING EDGE TECHNOLOGY, MARKET LEADERS IN NEW IDEAS AND THEY NEVER CRASH!!

    I you use windows your one hell of a sucker and i feel sorry for you!

    If you want to lead buy a mac – if you want to follow buy a crap windows pc.

    I know which OS I will never use again!

  9. To give you an example of the time machine, the newspaper I work on in Long Beach has some old PC’s that reporters use to write stories at their desk. We’ve had internet on our local network for a couple of years but can’t hook it up to the older windows PC’s. We in the photo department have not only had internet for a couple of years, it’s wireless!
    When the owner of the newspaper was in town a few months ago the reporters hung signs on their PC stating “we want internet” (true story)
    They are slowly replacing the PC’s now. Yes the new ones work on the internet but so did the Mac’s that were purchased before the old PC’s.

  10. No matter how advanced wi-fi PC’s get, it won’t work flawlessly like on Apples unless Windows improves… and that’s the truth and the reason behind sluggish PC wireless performance.

  11. Yes, Macs have had wireless much longer than Wintel machines (either built in or at least the capability to add an internal card built in).
    Yes, Macs have had 801.11g much longer than Wintel machines (either built in or at least the capability to add an internal card built in).
    Yes, Macs work seemlessly with Airport and Airport Extreme base stations.
    Yes, it is much easier to secure a Mac and Airport based wireless system (ever notice how easy it is to restrict access based upon the Media Access Controller [MAC] address of a particular computer so that only specific computers have any chance at all to access your WiFi network? It is much more difficult to do this on a Wintel/non-Apple system.)
    All these things, and more, are true.
    However, walk through any major airport terminal, watch TV or read major magazines today. What do you see? Adds by Intel (and to a lesser extent, Microsoft, Dell, HP, etc.) all loudly proclaiming their wireless capabilities.
    Thus who does 90+% of the world think of when they think of wireless and wireless innovations?
    Definitely not Macintosh and definitely not Apple.
    This is just one more case out of literally thousands of such cases over the past 20+ years that Apple has blown it in marketing.

  12. Yes, the lack Apple of advertisments in public, media (tabloids) or TV is a mayor drawback. You see advertisments in magazines for the professional, but the mayority is unaware of the qualities of a Macintosh computer. Sad thing this is. Wake up Apple!!!

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