CNET incorrectly reports Apple adds SuperDrive to eMac today; Apple actually did it on August 13,200

“Apple Computer introduced an updated version of its eMac desktop system Tuesday, adding a faster processor and DVD-burning capabilities,’ Matt Hines reports for CNET News.com. “The new model, a revamp of Apple’s top-end eMac, is the first of the line to offer the company’s SuperDrive DVD recorder/CD burner, and it features a 1.25GHz processor, a step up from Apple’s previous 1GHz machines. The upgraded eMac features 333MHz DDR memory, faster graphics and USB 2.0 ports. The computers will retail for $999, representing a drop of $100 off Apple’s current pricing for its most powerful eMacs. The company will continue to offer a $799 version of the desktop with a smaller hard drive and no SuperDrive.”

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: What is going on at CNET? Apple introduced the eMac with SuperDrive on August 13, 2002. It took us less than 20 seconds to find this information online, yet CNET headlines their article about the new eMacs today with “Apple adds Superdrive to eMac line.” What are they doing over there now, just totally making stuff up? A little research goes a long way, CNET.

24 Comments

  1. They are the biggest M$ fanboys on earth and they have absolutely no clue about anything from anyone else. That’s precisely why I stopped reading their crap “news” site long, long ago…

  2. First paragraph of CNET article (as amended):

    “Apple Computer introduced an updated version of its eMac desktop system Tuesday, adding a faster processor and speedier DVD-burning capabilities.”

    Seems accurate to me. What ARE y’all grousing about?

  3. Either CNet is on the payroll of Microsoft or they are a bunch of lazy journalists wannabe. Assuming that they get no paycheck from Microsoft, their style is probably the easiest way of writing an article.

    5 steps of writing an article for CNet
    1. Read a headline news. No research is required.
    2. Just write anything, publish and read feedbacks.
    3. Change as necessary.
    4. ???
    5. Profit <– In CNet’s case, though, I think they are stuck at step 4.

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