Apple shares set another new 52-week high to close at $26.74

Yesterday Apple Computer (AAPL) set a new 52-week high to close up $1.24, or 5.18%, at $25.16 in heavier-than-usual trading of 11,789,828 share volume. AAPL shares today surged $1.58, or 6.28%, to close with another new 52-week high of $26.74 on fairly massive volume of 27,442,306.

NASDAQ AAPL quote here.

13 Comments

  1. 52-week high….whooooooppppeeeeeee!
    That means it has been down for a year and just finally above where it was a year ago….
    i am underwhelmified!

  2. Quote:

    “i am underwhelmified!” – drismal345

    You may be underwhelmed. People who bought at $12 are rich. Remember: “Buy low, sell high.”

    Mike

  3. Hmmm, Now at a 3 year high. Driven they say by Mini ipod success and a rumor that Sony is going to buy them (which I don’t think will happen). Wish I woulda bought at 13 but at least I got in on some at under 20.

  4. Okay, here’s the deal:

    1. We all buy Apple stock now.
    2. We come up with a list of companies that should buy Apple.
    3. We release a rumor each week with a new company buying out Apple.
    4. Profit!!

  5. Quoth drismal345:

    ’52-week high….whooooooppppeeeeeee!
    That means it has been down for a year and just finally above where it was a year ago….
    i am underwhelmified!’

    Read the article again. ANOTHER new 52-week high. AAPL has been setting 52-week highs regularly for some time now. As Jack points out, it’s higher than it has been in three years.

    If you’re that easy to ‘underwhelmify’ with market data you don’t understand, you shouldn’t be in the markets. If you were equally ignorant about computers, you’d probably think Macs can’t do email.

  6. Jail, schmail!

    6. The sentence would be served at a (pardon the pun) minimum-security institution, likely one with a 9-hole golf course.

    7. In less than 2 years, we’re released to spend our profits. It’s a GOOD thing! ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”wink” style=”border:0;” />

  7. OK then, carrying this on…

    8. Be sued by disgruntled investors who lost money.
    9. Pay our lawyers all the profits.
    9. End up at the local Salvation Army soup kitchen.

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