“Maybe the London-based hacker group — which goes by the name ‘Turkish Crime Family’ — doesn’t have access to 250-million Apple iCloud account names and passwords,” Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols writes for ZDNet. “But they do have access to some indeterminate number of accounts, and that’s more than enough reason to exercise caution: Protect your iCloud’s password and data today or risk losing it tomorrow.”

“First, you need to back up your iCloud data,” Vaughan-Nichols writes. “Yes, I know Apple’s idea was you could use iCloud to back up your Apple device data, and that’s fine, but it’s iCloud itself we’re worried about today.”

“The only problem here is that iTunes doesn’t back everything up. For example, it won’t back up your Apple Pay information and settings, photos already on iCloud, or purchased iTunes and App Stores content. So, to be safe you really must change and secure your password,” Vaughan-Nichols writes. “Then, you’re going to want to add another layer of protection: Two-factor authentication (2FA). Apple’s 2FA is clunky, but it still does a great job of protecting your account.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Good advice. Better safe than sorry!

Use two-factor verification for Apple ID to keep your personal information as secure as possible. More info here.

Always use unique passwords and use Apple’s Keychain Access and iCloud Keychain to create and manage them. When used properly, it works like a dream.

SEE ALSO:
Apple: ‘Turkish Crime Family’ hackers did not breach iCloud, usernames and passwords likely obtained from compromised third-parties – March 23, 2017
Hackers threaten to wipe millions of iPhones and iCloud accounts if Apple doesn’t pay up by April 7th – March 22, 2017
Yahoo discloses ‘largest hack of all time,’ says hackers stole data from over one billion users – December 15, 2016
Windows to blame for Home Depot’s gigantic security breach; senior executives given new MacBooks and iPhones – November 10, 2014
Target debacle: Retailer now says 70 million people hit in massive data breach – January 10, 2014
Report: 6.5 million LinkedIn passwords stolen – June 6, 2012