“Echoes of the iPhone are everywhere. Xiaomi’s phones and Google’s new Pixel are designed to fool you into thinking that they just might be an iPhone,” Om Malik writes for The New Yorker. “Samsung, famously, was found to have infringed Apple’s iPhone design patents, a case that made its way to the Supreme Court. In 2012, a jury told Samsung to pay a billion dollars in damages to Apple.”

“That Samsung is facing such steep costs suggests the appeal of the original Apple design,” Malik writes. “When I asked John Maeda, the former president of the Rhode Island School of Design, why, then, people have turned on the design of the iPhone 7, he pointed out that perhaps these critics ‘seem to believe that there’s some as yet unimaginable transcendence that can happen in a small, palm-shaped, rectangular device.'”

MacDailyNews Take: Or because these critics are shortsighted fools and/or paid to pump out anti-Apple bullshit.

“The original iPhone was about defining a foundation for the future,” Malik writes. “It was different from other phones on the market—it made a rectangular touchscreen the main way to interact, displacing buttons and keypads. Now the iPhone is the essence of a phone.”

“Design, however, is more than just looks, a point that has been well illustrated by Samsung and the terrible trouble it has had with its flagship device, the Galaxy Note 7,” Malik writes. “The seamless interaction between the technologies hidden behind the screen, the software, and our services is good design. Apple thus far has made sure that it gets most of that experience right—especially the stuff under the hood. Perhaps the next time someone criticizes its designs, we should remember: good design means your phone doesn’t explode.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: If it’s not an iPhone, it’s an incendiary device cobbled together by a South Korean dishwasher maker.

Oh, you don’t have a real iPhone? You’re easily fooled, we see.

I don’t know which is worse: Samsung’s slavish copying or that there are tens of millions of dullards and/or morally-crippled consumers who would buy such obvious knockoffs. What kind of person rewards thieves, especially such obvious ones? What kind of person hands over their money to make sure that crime pays? What’s wrong with you people, exactly?

It makes me sad that there are outfits like Samsung Electronics on the planet, as I was with Microsoft before them. People who work for Samsung Electronics should be ashamed. It makes me even sadder to see people supporting blatant criminals, whether it be blindly or, worse, knowingly. To those people I say: Get some morals, will you, or how about at least acquiring a modicum of taste?

What you’re doing is supporting criminal activity. It’s like you’re buying knockoff Coach handbags, but you’re paying pretty much the Coach price! Not too smart, eh? Oh, sure, you might have “saved” a bit upfront on your fake iPhone (maybe you got one of those Buy One Get One or More Free deals), but you’re paying the same data rates – after a couple years, you’ve pretty much paid the same anyway! So, in the end, you’re saving little or nothing while:

a) depriving the company who basically inspired your inferior, fragmented product;
b) depriving yourself of the real deal and the real experience, and;
c) rewarding the criminal, encouraging them to steal even more.

Not a lot of sense being made in any aspect of your toting around that Android phone, is there? Oh, right it’s “open.” Smirk. And, yes, every one of us with the real thing knows that you’re carrying around a half-assed fake, you tasteless wonder.

Didn’t you people have parents? If so, what did they teach you, if anything? Sheesh.SteveJack, MacDailyNews, August 6, 2012

Apple’s products came first, then Samsung’s:

Samsung Galaxy and Galaxy Tab Trade Dress Infringement

For good measure, here’s what Google’s Android looked like before and after Apple’s iPhone:

Google Android before and after Apple iPhone

And, here’s what cellphones looked like before and after Apple’s iPhone:

cellphones before and after Apple iPhone

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