“A new advertisement for Google Photos presents a solution for storage woes on low-capacity iPhones,” Mike Wuerthele reports for ApppleInsider. “But the pitch could have less relevancy if rumors prove true and Apple gives up on 16-gigabyte base configurations with the ‘iPhone 7.'”

“The advertisement preys on fears of missing out, and demonstrates Google Photos’ “free up space” feature where pictures and videos taken on an iPhone are offloaded to the cloud and not retained on the phone,” Wuerthele reports. “Apple’s iCloud has similar features with paid storage, but Google’s photo storage is unlimited for users that select ‘high quality’ in Google Photos.”

Wuerthele reports, “Rumors have circulated throughout most of 2016, claiming that the “iPhone 7″ expected in September will include 32 gigabytes of storage for the entry level model.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Always ask yourself, “What’s the catch?”

Do you really trust The Creepster Company with your personal photos?

As we wrote over a year ago regarding Google Photos:

We believe that Google will eventually monetize their “free” image data gathering operation. For example:

• She looked good in 2005. Height estimate: 5′ 4″. Weight estimate: 110 lbs. In 2015, she’s up to an estimated 150 lbs. Serve up those Weight Watchers ads!

• The wedding photos were nice. June 7th, 2003. But, the photos of them together ended in 2014. He’s not consistently been with anyone significant since then. Serve up the dating ads!

• The post-chemo photos started in January 2008. They ended that same year. Now, they’re back and it’s looking worse than ever. Serve up the funeral parlor ads! (And start emailing the kids about how easy it is to transfer their mom’s Google Photos library to their devices – for FREE, of course.)

Ah, the price of “free.”

As for 16GB iPhones:

Obviously, 16GB is for a certain target market, one that can live in the iCloud. The problem with that model, however, is that inexperienced buyers and inattentive resellers foist 16GB iPhones on people who really cannot manage to live in the iCloud and therefore could end up hating their iPhone (it won’t update, it’s perpetually packed full and therefore runs poorly, can’t take any photos, can’t download any more apps, etcetera).

Apple needs to ask themselves if the benefits of having a 16GB iPhone (“low” entry price and upselling platform for higher capacity iPhones) are worth the risk of disappointing those who are likely buying their first iPhone. For Apple, the quality of the user experience should always come first. — MacDailyNews, July 4, 2015

SEE ALSO:
Leaks shows Apple may ditch entry-level 16GB iPhones – July 5, 2016
Apple Photos vs. Google Photos – October 26, 2015
Dvorak: Google Photos is too creepy – June 3, 2015
Tim Cook attacks Google, U.S. federal government over right to privacy abuses – June 3, 2015
The price you’ll pay for Google’s ‘free’ photo storage – June 3, 2015
Apple CEO Tim Cook champions privacy, blasts ‘so-called free services’ – June 3, 2015
Passing on Google Photos for iOS: Read the fine print before you sign up for Google’s new Photos service – June 1, 2015
Why Apple’s Photos beats Google Photos, despite price and shortcomings – May 30, 2015
Is Apple is losing the photo wars? – May 29, 2015
How Google aims to delve deeper into users’ lives – May 29, 2015
Apple CEO Cook: Unlike some other companies, Apple won’t invade your right to privacy – March 2, 2015
Survey: People trust U.S. NSA more than Google – October 29, 2014
Apple CEO Tim Cook ups privacy to new level, takes direct swipe at Google – September 18, 2014
Apple will no longer unlock most iPhones, iPads for government, police – even with search warrants – September 18, 2014
U.S. NSA watching, tracking phone users with Google Maps – January 28, 2014
U.S. NSA secretly infiltrated Yahoo, Google data centers worldwide, Snowden documents say – October 30, 2013
Google has already inserted some U.S. NSA code into Android – July 10, 2013
Court rules NSA doesn’t have to reveal its semi-secret relationship with Google – May 22, 2013
Edward Snowden’s privacy tips: ‘Get rid of Dropbox,” avoid Facebook and Google – October 13, 2014