“Now that the FBI has cracked into the San Bernardino iPhone, a new debate has been raised over who helped them… Israeli mobile forensics firm Cellebrite — or professional hackers-for-hire,” Steve Morgan reports for Forbes.

“There were numerous reports in the media at the end of last month — including a post on Forbes — which said the FBI used a mobile extraction device from Cellebrite, a division of Sun Corp., to hack into the shooter’s iPhone 5c,” Morgan reports. “In the post, cybersecurity expert John McAfee asserts the FBI knew all along they could unlock an iPhone with a Cellebrite UFED Touch — but the FBI was less interested in Apple AAPL -2.02% than it was in precedent.”

“A story in the Washington Post last week reports the FBI enlisted the services of professional hackers — and not Cellebrite — to hack into the San Bernardino iPhone,” Morgan reports. “In a follow up email exchange, McAfee was asked if he stood by his claims that Cellebrite helped the FBI — or if he believed newer reports claiming the FBI was assisted by unnamed paid hackers. ‘The Washington Post’s source is wrong’ says McAfee.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Either way, it seems clear that iPhone with Secure Enclaves are immune to the method used.

SEE ALSO:
FBI paid professional hackers one-time fee to crack San Bernardino iPhone – April 13, 2016
FBI director confirms hack only works on older iPhones that lack Apple’s Secure Enclave – April 7, 2016
Here’s how much the FBI is paying Cellebrite for its iPhone hack – March 25, 2016
Meet Cellebrite, the Israeli company reportedly cracking iPhones for the FBI – March 24, 2016