“I’m surprised Apple didn’t see this at first, but I know the company learns fast,” Jonny Evans writes for Computerworld.

“It started with an app, TV Maps from indie developer Arno Appenzeller,” Evans writes. “His app (a Maps client for Apple TV—take a look) made me realize Apple TV could transform education by making it part of daily life.”

“Traditionally, TV is a one-way entertainment vehicle, a ‘sit-down’ medium. Watching TV and playing games are its two killer apps, but you don’t necessarily want to interact with your TV set. That’s fine because until very recent developments in gaming consoles you couldn’t interact much,” Evans writes. “And then came the Apple Siri Remote, which lets you control your TV with touch, voice and (mostly) virtual buttons. Until now the focus of this has been on convenience for consumers navigating through media, but this focus on convenience occludes insight into the interactive nature of the new medium.

Evans writes, “Though when you ask Siri for a weather report, you get a sense of how interactive television is going to become.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Interactivity will increase, for sure. Hopefully, technology can help to improve education, too.