“As the Samsung Galaxy Note 4 launches in South Korea, reports have emerged in the Korean press of an unusual hardware issue affecting some Note 4 units,” Alex Dobie reports for Android Central.

“The story, first broken by local outlet IT Today, says some Korean Note 4s include a gap between the screen and the metal trim large enough to insert a business card,” Dobie reports. “Samsung directly addresses this issue in its manual for the European Galaxy Note 4, which arrived on the company’s support site in the past day. Tucked away on page 180 of the document, under the ‘Troubleshooting’ section, is the following — ‘A small gap appears around the outside of the device case. This gap is a necessary manufacturing feature and some minor rocking or vibration of parts may occur. Over time, friction between parts may cause this gap to expand slightly.'”

Samsung's Galaxy Note 4 features a "gap" between the screen and the casing that can expand over time

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 4 features a “gap” between the screen and the casing that can expand over time

MacDailyNews Take: Samsung has probably already added another bullet point to its oh-so-beloved spec sheet: “Business Card Holder!”

 
“This suggests the Note 4 screen gap is a characteristic of the device in general, not just a manufacturing aberration affecting early adopters,” Dobie reports. “The second bullet point may give buyers pause, however, as a widening gap between screen and chassis doesn’t exactly inspire confidence in the device’s build quality.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Compare this actual issue with the non-issue shitstorm of FUD that greeted the iPhone 6 Plus. Now imagine the reaction if Apple attempted to sell a device that “features” a dirt-, moisture-, and scum-collecting gap that “expands” over time? Go ahead, we’ll wait; it takes some time to fully imagine 317 quadrillion articles, podcasts, and YouTube videos. But, with Samsung, nope… nary a peep.

Well, we guess when one settles for cheap, blatant knockoffs, inferior apps, rampant malware, and other assorted niceties, one also expects a certain shoddiness with the hardware, huh?

We wouldn’t know.

 
 

[Attribution: The Loop. Thanks to MacDailyNews readers too numerous to mention individually for the heads up.]

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