“Movie executives and first-time directors trudging through the snow this year at the Sundance Film Festival in Utah will find tales of pornography and sex addiction awaiting them, in a trend to show more skin at Robert Redford’s annual film showcase,” Piya Sinha-Roy reports for Reuters. “Showing in theaters alongside the Steve Jobs biopic “jOBS,” festival goers can catch a movie about porn star Linda Lovelace, played by Amanda Seyfried in ‘Lovelace,’ and British soft porn publishing magnate Paul Raymond, played by Steve Coogan in Michael Winterbottom’s ‘The Look of Love.'”

“One of the hotly anticipated premieres is comedy ‘Don Jon’s Addiction,’ actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s directorial debut about a porn addict who tries to change his ways. It opens on Friday,” Sinha-Roy reports. “Gordon-Levitt, who plays the title role leads a star-studded cast including Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore, who play two women who help the porn addict become less selfish.”

“In its 35th year, the annual Sundance Film Festival, held in the snowy streets of Park City, Utah, has become a launch pad for low-budget films and unknown stars in films that need investors,” Sinha-Roy reports. “Co-founded in 1978 by actor-director Redford, this year’s 119 films were culled from 12,000 submissions. The ten-day festival, starting on January 17, showcases the films in competitions and low-key premieres that serve as an antidote to Hollywood’s glittering awards season.”

Sinha-Roy reports, “Even in death, Apple CEO Steve Jobs is the festival’s biggest star. The biography ‘jOBS,’ starring Ashton Kutcher as the entrepreneur, claimed the coveted spot closing the festival. It was selected in part because festival organizers wanted to take advantage of the late computer executive’s enduring popularity, said Sundance director John Cooper. It didn’t hurt that the film is already selling well with buyers, he added… The documentary roster will also feature R.J. Cutler’s film ‘The World According to Dick Cheney,’ which profiles the former U.S. vice president, and Alex Gibney’s ‘We Steal Secrets: The Story of Wikileaks,’ about the new era of information transparency.”

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