“Yet again, Apple announced record sales and earnings. Yet again, its ‘Jobs report’ stood in stark contrast to the monthly official jobs report,” Zachary Karabell writes for The Daily Beast. “For the past four years, as the U.S. economy has stumbled, Apple has soared.”

“As millions have lost jobs or stayed underemployed, Apple has sold more phones, iPads, and computers than most thought possible,” Karabell writes. “And it has seen its most dramatic success during one of the worst economic slumps in the developed world.”

Karabell writes, “In many ways, its growth makes no sense. If the economies of the developed world are suffering—and until very recently, Apple was not selling significantly in China or the emerging world—how has Apple made hundreds of billions of dollars? … Apple’s emergence is a prime example of the disconnect between nations and companies, between the relative affluence of countless people in developed nations and the relative poverty of their governments. And it is the most potent example of how companies have broken free of any one national economy and created the new transnational entity of Corporateland.”

“Apple has about 60,000 full-time employees around the world. Apple is a $600 billion company and growing. Nigeria has a population of about 170 million and a GDP less than half Apple’s market capitalization,” Karabell writes. “Such comparisons may seem facile, but they should be made over and over until the full weight sinks in. Apple is not just a cool computer/phone/tablet company. It is an ecosystem and a society with more influence and power than most nations… It is time to see it in a new light, as a global power more important to the world today and in the future than most countries that so dominate our collective consciousness.”

Read more in the full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader "ShisQuBa-BaShazam" for the heads up.]