“MultiTouch.framework is a native Cocoa multi-touch framework for Mac OS X. It uses the default event handling system and the responder chain of the operating system, providing a familiar application programming interface to Mac OS X developers. It is built upon a modular low-level architecture that unifies all touch events, with input units for different multi-touch input devices including FTIR, DI, iPhone/iPod touch, as well as any TUIO-based devices. Thus, as a developer, you do not need to care about the actual input device being used,” The Media Computing Group explains.

“One of the great advantages of this toolkit is that you can develop and test your multi-touch application on your standard desktop Mac, using your iPhone as multi-touch input device, without having to work at an FTIR table all the time,” The Media Computing Group explains.

The Media Computing Group are currently working on the first public release and plan to provide an early version of the framework soon.

More info here.

Cocoa Multi-Touch Framework for Mac OS X in action:

Direct link via YouTube here.

MacDailyNews Take: Take a MacBook and replace the trackpad with an “iPhone”… Or, perhaps, take a MacBook, maybe even make it a bit smaller (10 or 12”?), and replace the bottom half (both the keyboard* and trackpad) with a larger “iPhone”… Voilà! Say “hello” to the MacBook DS, er… MacBook touch.

*No sense lugging that keyboard around all the time, just have it only when you want it as with iPhone; maybe even featuring haptics, too.

“We are working to develop new products that contain technologies that our competition will not be able to match.” – Apple CFO Peter Oppenheimer, July 21, 2008